My Life, My Light, My Love: Photography by Mamie M. Lomax

“My work focuses on 19th and early to mid-20th century gravestones and other aspects of historic cemeteries. The silence is pleasantly deafening in the cemeteries that I have visited, and each has brought different inspiration to me. There is something beautiful about being in a cemetery right before the sunsets.”

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“These pictures are from Rose Hill Cemetery in Columbia, TN. Rose Hill is the fifth stop on my cemetery journey through Middle Tennessee. The journey continues with Mt. Olivet cemetery and Old City Cemetery in Nashville, TN next on the list.”

 

Mamie M. Lomax is a journalism student at MTSU. She is working on her portfolio in order to debut her work officially. She works as a barista in her spare time, as well as dabbles in bass, writing and being a pug mom.  You can find her on Instagram at _mamiemMamie Lomax.cropped.

Art & Design Open House

On March 17th, I had the unusual opportunity to be on campus on a Saturday, and I was surprised by the amount of activity I found. Parking lots were full; visitors to campus strolled the wide sidewalks from Peck Hall to the Student Union. Though on campus for the Linguistics Olympiad, I had the chance to visit the Art and Design Open House in the Todd art building, and I soon found myself wishing I had nothing else to do. A variety of workshops and demonstrations beckoned from the galleries, classrooms, and hallways, and it was with regret that I moved far too rapidly from one to the next and still got to see less than half of what was offered. Of course, if I had been blessed with more time, I would have settled in at my first stop, rolled up my sleeves, tie dyed a tee shirt with Amanda Micheletto-Blouin, and seen nothing else.

A sign coming into the Todd Building suggested there were twelve activities, and I visited only six—an encaustic workshop, led by Erin Anfinson

the Art Ed Printmaking room with Mary Ellis and Brigette Adkins

an inking demonstration by Doug Dabbs

silk screening with Tanner Pancake

an etching demo by Kenny Page

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and the tie dye workshop. Others I didn’t get to see included sculpture, letterpress, button making, vinyl cutting, sand casting, 3-d printing, and illustration. Hmmm…math isn’t my strong suit, but I’m guessing extra activities were added after the sign was made. Regardless, if a similar event comes along again, I will be there, ready to dig in and enjoy, and I hope you will be too!

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Mohamed Abotaleb: Charles Bukowski’s “Bluebird”

Mohamed Abotaleb is a sophomore Media and Entertainment major at MTSU. His video was produced, however, for an English 2030 class in the fall of 2017. His artist’s statement, below, doesn’t mention the fact it took five or six attempts (after many more practice readings) to capture just the right tone and emphasis in the audio recording. We think it was worth the effort!

“The video is based on the poem “Bluebird” By the famous American poet “Charles Bukowski.” Bukowski writes about the reality of the world, regardless of how harsh it is. The whole poem is a metaphor for his emotional struggle, and the blue bird he is talking about throughout the poem represents his personal struggle to express his true feelings. I chose this poem because I love poems that relate more to the real, harsh world we live in. Most times, I find myself or my close friends saying that they hide their true feelings about certain topics to avoid damage or anxiety. This poem tries to show the world and criticize the judgmental nature of our society, how it looks upon people, expecting them all to withdraw their feelings and assimilate into one large emotionless, mindless entity.

“Finding footage online that represented the feelings was quite challenging but truly worth the effort. I shot some of the video on my iPhone, which was quite convenient because I have it with me all the time. I wanted to capture something that related to the poem. I also used phone’s internal mic. It was good enough to capture my voice and filter surrounding noise. I edited the footage with Adobe Premiere and used music I previously bought from a music store. I hope you, as a viewer, connect with the poem and video emotionally, and hopefully the footage conveys the feelings the author intended.”

See more of Mohamed’s video work on his Vimeo account!